Looking for Carpet Cleaning: A+ Restoration & Cleaning

A+ Restoration & Cleaning aplusrestorationandcleaning.com are experts in flood remediation, mold removal, disinfecting and sanitizing, stain removal, restorative carpet care and epoxy floor cleaning, sofa and bed cleaning, and mattress odor control.” Amenity Cleaning Systems’ website lists several of their products. They also have a number of ideas and tips for successfully cleaning mold, mildew, and allergens from your home carpet.

A Restoration Cleaning

I was asked to review an e-book by someone with the name “Emily Sander,” regarding a mold removal process called a composting system. I have often heard that word, “composting” is the same thing as “massage therapy.” However, my research brought up nothing regarding “carpet cleaning.” It appears that the author of the e-book does not have a clue about what is actually done in a compost pile.

The company is part of the Panaman City, California based Resource Consultants, LLC. The company’s Web site shows pictures of a clean room, including carpeting, furniture, and other surfaces. It also has a lot of helpful information about their services. One section of the site contains articles written by Amy Waterman, who describes herself as a certified carpentry contractor. It appears that Ms. Waterman uses some of her ideas in her book, including a mold remediation cleaning method called a composting method.

This method involves spraying the rooms with a chemical that breaks down the mold spores. That spray is then used on the carpeted surface of the rooms. A door is left open, so the worker can vacuum the mold spores out of the air. However, it is recommended that this mold remediation method should only be used by trained professionals.

In a conclusion, Amy Waterman’s A+ restoration & cleaning is a good resource for people who are thinking about starting their own company. However, I would recommend against doing something like this, especially for someone who is not experienced or knowledgeable about mold. I would recommend learning more about mold and black mold removal from professional sources, so the house remains mold free.

Some further negative comments about Amy Waterman’s A+ restoration & cleaning include her advertising of a cleaning method that does not do a great job. She says that the product kills mold spores, but does not kill all the spores. I have seen this claim in other companies, but this is not the first time this claim has been made. I once saw a television commercial for a company that made similar claims.

The company ultimately did not succeed because all the spores were killed, and the rest were not affected. The product did not do an adequate job. The mold was still there. I would recommend this company for basic mold cleaning only, not something more complex.

Amy Waterman’s A+ restoration & cleaning is informative and interesting, as well as full of helpful suggestions and advice. The book has a forward and a review of the book, as well as a list of links and telephone numbers for additional information. This is a good book for anyone who is considering starting their own cleaning service or business. The techniques that are taught are easy to understand, and the book is filled with real life case studies.

Waterman repeatedly encourages you to go green in your restoration work. While it may be good practice to use natural products, I am not sure how well the techniques in the book would apply to this situation. There are many green cleaning products on the market today that could do the same job as the products described in the Waterman book. In addition, some of these cleaners are actually far more toxic than others.

It seems as if Waterman bases her information on the premise that all damage to non-porous surfaces must be done in order to effectively clean the surface. This is not necessarily true. Nonporous surfaces can develop water damage due to exposure to flood waters or other water causing situations. I have cleaned shower walls, bathroom walls, basement floors, tile, counter tops, and even ceiling tiles under high level flood water without developing any major water damage. I also cleaned walls exposed to fire fighting foam ceilings in high fire prone areas without developing any major water damage.

In conclusion, the a+ restoration & cleaning guide is a good basic manual for anyone with a lot of water damage to clean. It does contain some excellent strategies for drying damaged areas and preventing future buildup of organic material. However, it does leave some gaps. I think the best way to approach water damage is to use a dehumidifier and mild soap with a PH neutral. This approach will prevent the development of mold and mildew on already dry walls and ceilings, and will likely prevent discoloration of already bright tile.